Read opal by Kristina Wojtaszek Online

opal

White as snow, stained with blood, her talons black as ebony... In this retwisting of the classic Snow White tale, the daughter of an owl is forced into human shape by a wizard who’s come to guide her from her wintry tundra home down to the colorful world of men and Fae, and the father she’s never known. She struggles with her human shape and grieves for her dead mother —White as snow, stained with blood, her talons black as ebony... In this retwisting of the classic Snow White tale, the daughter of an owl is forced into human shape by a wizard who’s come to guide her from her wintry tundra home down to the colorful world of men and Fae, and the father she’s never known. She struggles with her human shape and grieves for her dead mother — a mother whose past she must unravel if men and Fae are to live peacefully together.Trapped in a Fae-made spell, Androw waits for the one who can free him. A boy raised to be king, he sought refuge from his abusive father in the Fae tales his mother spun. When it was too much to bear, he ran away, dragging his anger and guilt with him, pursuing shadowy trails deep within the Dark Woods of the Fae, seeking the truth in tales, and salvation in the eyes of a snowy hare. But many years have passed since the snowy hare turned to woman and the woman winged away on the winds of a winter storm leaving Androw prisoner behind walls of his own making — a prison that will hold him forever unless the daughter of an owl can save him....

Title : opal
Author :
Rating :
ISBN : 16778538
Format Type : Kindle Edition
Number of Pages : 588 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

opal Reviews

  • Pam
    2019-05-04 21:19

    Wow.I'll admit, first off, that the fantasy genre isn't my usual genre of choice. After reading Opal however, I may be rethinking my selections!!Kristina Wojtaszek does a beautiful job of blending two worlds together. Her descriptions leave you breathless... " I awoke several times that night, shivering in my tomb as tears of ice fell on me." Come on, that's some good stuff right there! I found myself saying "I'll just read 5 more pages..." and before I knew it the book was over. Too soon. Loved it thoroughly and completely. It was simple, it was complex. It was mysterious and thought provoking. It took me outside my normal box for which I'm thankful. A+++.

  • Janet Slipak
    2019-05-18 02:38

    In this retelling of the classic Snow White tale, the daughter of an owl is forced into human shape by a wizard who’s come to guide her from her wintry tundra home down to the colorful world of men and Fae, and the father she’s never known. She struggles with her human shape and grieves for her dead mother—a mother whose past she must unravel if men and Fae are to live peacefully together.Trapped in a Fae-made spell, Androw waits for the one who can free him. A boy raised to be king, he sought refuge from his abusive father in the Fae tales his mother spun. And when it was too much to bear, he ran away, dragging his anger and guilt with him, pursuing shadowy trails deep within the Dark Woods of the Fae, seeking the truth in tales, and salvation in the eyes of a snowy hare. But many years have passed since the snowy hare turned to woman and the woman winged away on the winds of a winter storm leaving Androw prisoner behind walls of his own making—a prison that will hold him forever unless the daughter of an owl can save him.MY THOUGHTS:I received this book in exchange for an honest review. I don’t read many novellas, not out of choice, but I’ve never stumbled across any that caught my eye. Then I saw this book.An original (which is an accomplishment in itself) retelling of an old fairy tale. Such a stunning tale woven lyrically into a book you just can’t put down. A quick read, one easily done in one sitting, I whipped through this book unable to stop reading because I needed to know what was happening next.And the writer’s voice was mesmerizing, wonderfully hypnotic/spell-binding and gripping. The plot flowed expertly, catching you off-guard now and then with unexpected twists and turns… just perfect. I absolutely loved the character development, with secondaries propelling the Protagonist toward her ultimate goal in such a compelling way.I found myself emotionally invested in the writing, constantly nodding my head and smiling. And, there were a few sad tears too. A beautifully written retelling that I recommend to everyone who loves fantasy writing, beautiful world-building and extraordinary story-telling.

  • Linda
    2019-05-06 22:17

    I read this tale when it was included in an anthology, A Winter's Enchantment - a mesmerizing assortment of three festive holiday fantasy novellas penned by authors who were all new to me at the time I picked it up. Anthologies are normally hard for me to review as it’s difficult to assign one rating to a collection where I normally feel differently about the included stories. Happily, that was not the case with this anthology, as I absolutely loved each of the stories and didn’t want to put any of them down once I'd started reading them. OPAL Being an owl was simple. It was survival... An owl thinks only: fly, hunt, breed, live. People think, and wonder, and dream, and speak of it all. ---White as snow, stained with blood, her talons black as ebony...This is a fresh and exciting fractured retwisting of the classic Snow White fairytale as the daughter of an owl is forced into a human shape by a wizard. Meanwhile, Androw, a Prince, is caught in a Fae-made spell and only the daughter of an owl can save him. I have been horribly remiss in writing my review of this wonderful set of stories as this was truly a magical, beautifully written, paranormal collection - one that I would read again. I hope to check out other works by these same authors soon!My full review is published at Reading Between the Wines Book Club. Please check it out there.

  • Sara Zaske
    2019-04-27 19:45

    (This review can also be found on: YA Fantastic Book Review)This is the story of an owl who is changed into a girl when her mother dies— which seems almost the reverse of your usual fairy tale when the changing happens the other way. In Opal, when the young owlet becomes a girl, she starts to unravel the story of her mother, who was well-known to be as white as snow, as black as ebony, red as . . . Well you know that story right?While it might have some familiar fairy tale elements, Opal is a very different from any fairy tale I’ve read. It’s so fun to discover a book, and if you’ll excuse the obvious pun, Opal is truly a hidden gem. I picked this novella up on a whim. A small press followed me on Twitter, so I checked out their books, and downloaded a sample of Opal. And that was it. I was hooked. I think I’ll be like the second person to review this on Amazon. But I’m sure I won’t be the last.Opal is lyrical, beautiful, and haunting. It’s very original despite being a fairy tale re-take and fabulously well written. My only criticism was that it didn’t feel like it told the whole story. The main character does undergo a massive change in the novel, but she’s not very active in making it come about. Still, the novel is so enchanting, I didn’t mind.And if Opal is, in fact, just the beginning of a story, I’ll happily pick up the next one by Kristina Wojaszek. She’s a talented new author and one well worth watching.

  • Leah
    2019-05-21 23:36

    [A] retwisting of the classic Snow White tale in which the daughter of a snow owl must find her own identity while unraveling the story of her parents and her people.Opal set itself apart from others by its premise and its vivid imagery. The main character is an animal transformed into a human just as her journey to the truth begins. Normally, in a fairy tale, getting turned into an animal is a curse the protagonist has to overcome by breaking a spell or accepting their true self. Not in this story, and that was only one of the twists in Wojtaszek's fairytale-inspired fantasy. I wasn't sure if the alternating viewpoints ("Fire" for the owl-turned-human; "Stone" for the abused prince) would work for me, but ultimately, they did; I found switching between the two added a bit of tension and suspense as the owl-turned-human's journey brought her ever closer to Prince Androw's tale. All in all, an enjoyable story and I look forward to reading more by this author.4.5 stars(I docked half a star because 20-30 more pages would've added more depth to three "chapters" of the story that felt a bit rushed.)

  • Elise Edie
    2019-05-16 02:15

    It's not often that I read a book and feel like I am Discovering a Major New Talent, but this is the experience I had reading Kristina Wojtaszek's shimmering and atmospheric novella. A highly imaginative re-telling of the Snow White story, there is a surprise, a revelation or a finely wrought image on almost every page. My only complaint is the book just felt too dang short, since I would have been happy to have spent much longer in this wintery, spell-binding world.

  • Alia Eisele
    2019-05-09 23:37

    [I received a copy of Opal from World Weaver Press at no charge, in exchange for an honest review]You know you are reading a good book when you find yourself tearing up at the beginning, purely because the story is so beautifully-written. Rarely has an author caused my eyes to leak unrelated to the story's events, but somehow Kristina Wojtaszek manages to best choose the precise words that flow together and convey description and emotion with sheer perfection. I feel clumsy even trying to express my opinion adequately about her writing, like a gnat might feel when telling an owl how how majestic she is. There's some serious author-worship going on over here, guys.Opal gives readers two perspectives and two moments in time throughout the book. The difference in the "when" confused me for a while, which was likely due to the teaser on the back cover of the book. As it turns out, the "many years have passed" line doesn't really come into play until the end of the book. Don't worry, folks: this isn't a spoiler. The teaser itself actually ends up being the spoiler, and is really the only thing about this book that I don't much like.One of the biggest triumphs that I saw in Opal was that Wojtaszek so competently wove together a progression of the owl-girl's thoughts and actions, the reader can watch and take part in her transformation from animal-mindset focused on instinct and simplicity, to the human-mindset that encompasses a pursuit of knowledge, an establishment of trust and love of others, and a budding sense of humor. Her changes are palpable, although not overstated, and were this a longer book, likely would have continued to be just as interesting and endearing. My one wish for Opal is that it were much, much longer, because I could read Kristina Wojtaszek's writing for thousands of pages and still feel a gluttonous desire for more. This is a book that I highly recommend reading; then when you're done with Opal, jump right into Char, the next book in the Fae of Fire and Stone series. Thankfully, Char was just released in April, so you can get a good fix of Wojtaszek's exquisite fantasy and fairy tale writing before the next Really Long Time between novellas. Check out my review of Char and the Book Spotlight and Giveaway for a chance to win a copy of Char for yourself!This review was first published on Moonlight Gleam Reviews.

  • Chapter by Chapter
    2019-05-08 02:16

    Opal by Kristina Wojtaszek was such an interesting twist on the Snow White Fairytale. Told in the point of view of the present and the past, the tale of two woman come together in the end.Opal is told in the point of view of a prince named Androw, who leaves his home to get away from his tyrant of a father, and goes into the dark woods in search of a fairytale that he remembers from his youth. It is also told in the point of view of a woman who is not named until the end of the book, and follows her journey to understanding who she is and where she came from.I loved the emotion that poured out in this story. The love of a mother, the love of son for his mother, the love of a daughter for a mother she never really knew. I adored the twist of the Fae in this story. Where in the “original” Snow White, she was surrounded by the seven dwarves, in Opal, the seven are actually fae guardians. I also love the way in which the story of the woman who turned into a hare was incorporated into this story.I couldn’t quite understand why Eira does what she does when she thinks she’s protecting Androw. Unless I totally missed something, I saw no reason for her to do the spell that she does.As Opal by Kristina Wojtaszek is a novella, the author does a fantastic job of rehashing the past and present, and mixing them together into an unforgettable tale. I loved the way the element of magic was twisted into this tale, which had my imagination running wild. Author, Kristina Wojtaszek’s descriptions of the faeries in Opal were enchanting and had me yearning to learn more about their world.Fans of fairytale retellings and stories involving Faeries will fall in love with Opal by Kristina Wojtaszek. I can’t wait to see what she has planned next in her next installment, Obsidian.

  • Star
    2019-05-13 00:27

    An owlet, waiting for her mother to return, is found by a wizard and changed into a human girl. The girl, unused to two legs, speech, and of course being human is set on a journey to discover the truth about her origins and heritage. Paralleling the owl girl’s story is the story of Androw, a boy who goes into the forest to escape his abusive father and perhaps find the Fae of his mother’s stories. Both are fascinated by a woman whose skin was white as snow and hair as black as coal…‘Opal’ is an intriguing twist on the ‘Snow White’ fairy tale. Ms. Wojtaszek has given her readers a new interpretation of a classic fairy tale – whether you know the Disney or the original version. At this time the Fae are a dying breed – there are few full-blooded Fae left in the world due to the aggression of mankind. The author’s writing has a way of haunting your thoughts long after you finish the book. I got lost in the story because the imagery was so vivid and the characters were intriguing. I don’t want to give away too much, as this book is such a treat to read. I sincerely hope to read more of Ms. Wojtaszek’s work in the future! Series: Opal (1), Obsidian (2)

  • Robin
    2019-05-27 02:16

    Although I did like this book and would be interested in reading the sequel, there were a handful of things that bothered me about it. The first was the fact that I thought Opal and Androw were supposed to meet up with each other somehow and be together. The fact that Androw was actually Opal's father was confusing to me. It took me most of the book to figure this out. The second thing that bugged me a bit was how quick the ending moved. Once Opal and Androw met, time was rushed. I found it hard to keep up with any details on Opal's self discovery, and the impending war with Androw's enemies. The final chapter suggest that the time may have past for about two years in a short time. The final chapter through me off the most. Being seen through the existing yet not existing Eria's eyes. It took me a while to figure out who was narrating the chapter. I don't understand how Eira can be dead but still exist without being a ghost.

  • Dalene
    2019-05-22 20:33

    Opal by Kristina Wojtaszek I won and received an autographed copy of this book in a giveway on goodreads. The story goes back and fourth between telling Prince Androws story to the girl princess who has no name as yet because she was an owl turned to her real human self after her mothers death. When she is reunited with her father she gets her name. I liked the fairy tale feel of the book, it is about the fae and human world combined. I am not used to short story reads as of yet but I really enjoyed this book. I look forward to reading more books by Kristina Wojtaszek.

  • Susan Sullivan
    2019-05-22 22:34

    Absolutely gorgeous writing from a talented storyteller! This story held me in thrall from start to finish. I'd put off reading it for months and months because I'd tired of traditional fantasy and fairy tales ten years or so ago. I'd read a short story by Kristina in the anthology Specter Spectacular last year; it's one of my favorites in the collection. But after reading OPAL, I will have to make an exception and will definitely read any fantasy/fairy stories by Kristina Wojtaszek!

  • Amalia Dillin
    2019-05-21 19:39

    Wojtaszek builds such a rich world of fairy tales turned legend turned history for the characters in the story, and the way in which it unfolded was both unique and compelling. I'm fascinated by the fae and half-fae, and what role they'll play in the future of Opal's world in the next installment.

  • Rebecca
    2019-05-10 20:33

    This was a great twist on the Snow White story. The writing is lyrical, and the imagery is lovely. This is the kind of book you enjoy with a cup of tea and something sweet to eat while curled up in your favorite chair. This book is a must-read for fans of fairy tales.

  • Tess
    2019-05-05 02:34

    This book is beautifully written with a haunting quality that makes you want to read it carefully so you won't miss an important detail. Looking foreward to the sequel.

  • Jessica Baumgartner
    2019-05-23 01:35

    The first two thirds of the book really captured me. It slowed down towards the end and then stopped pretty abruptly, but the imagery and originality of this retelling was pretty good.